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Brian Cook


MBA Candidate, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College
BA, Sociology & English, Georgetown University

InGenius Prep

I am currently pursuing an MBA at the Amos Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College, where I am a Center for Leadership Fellow. Having been admitted to several top MBA programs and awarded multiple full-tuition merit scholarships, I have a deep appreciation and understanding of how to build and effectively communicate program “fit” in an application.

My passion for communication, storytelling and coaching is grounded in my academic and professional path. At Tuck, I spend the majority of my free time working as a chair of a student-led group called Tuck Talks, where I recruit and coach classmates, faculty, and staff to share the relationships and experiences that give us a sense of purpose. Before business school, I worked at Teach For America as both a middle school language arts teacher and a national director of recruitment focused on scaling growth strategies.

This passion is also grounded in my personal love of reading, traveling, and getting to know new people and cultures. I love spending time with my wife, three brothers, and family. I am also an avid reader and take every opportunity I can to travel internationally. I have spent time working in India, Kuwait and Spain, and I’ve traveled on a student-led Japan Fun Trek, competed in a sailing regatta in Italy, solo-backpacked through Switzerland, and honeymooned Thailand (just to name a few of my favorites).

I am poet & quant – I love the fusion of data, relationship building, and situational context to identify opportunities, construct vision, and execute on winning strategies. I’m looking forward to getting to know you, your story, and ensuring that you are successful in your next steps!

Popular articles by Brian

All articles by Brian

GMAT Essay Tips: Preparing for the Analytical Writing Assessment

GMAT Essay Tips Preparing for the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) portion of the GMAT seems to many of my students a waste of precious practice time, when what really “matters” is your 800-scaled score. Fair enough. But if you’re not regularly testing at the score you want, why not add an essay score of 6Keep reading

LSAT Logic Games: The “Substitute Constraint” Question Type

Most of my LSAT students identify the “substitute constraint” or “substitute condition” question type as the most difficult type on LSAT logic games. At first glance, students attempt to test each scenario presented in the answer choices, wasting precious time, and often spinning their wheels. And, even if they “get lucky” discovering the correct answer,Keep reading

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